snowfall
3”
since
lifts closed
55”
summit
Depth
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
INCHES
This Season
0 /12LIFTS OPEN
TRAM CLOSED
Since 9:00 AM
Temps
Tram Summit
Gondi Summit
Terrain
130 /134
Trails Open
37
Groomed Trails
  • Today
Cody Bowl
Cody Bowl
Top of Thunder Chair
Top of Thunder Chair
Thunder Chair, Tower 2
Thunder Chair, Tower 2
Gondola Summit
Gondola Summit
Casper
Casper
Base of the Gondola
Base of the Gondola
Base of Teewinot Chair
Base of Teewinot Chair
Tram Station Cam
Tram Station Cam
Mountain View
Mountain View
Apres Vous
Apres Vous
3”

Safety

This mountain is like nothing you have experienced before. Its terrain presents everything from groomed slopes to dangerous cliffs, and its weather is just as variable. During periods of low visibility or other inclement weather and snow conditions, the degree of difficulty of these runs for each individual may change. For specific trail conditions, ask a Ski Patroller or a Mountain Host. It is important to use extra caution to prevent getting lost or making a mistake that could result in a serious injury or death. Please protect yourself by obeying all trail signs and markers.

For Ski Patrol assistance, dial 2650 on a ski patrol telephone or contact the nearest lift operator. You can also dial 307.739.2650 on your cell phone.

By entering this area, you are assuming and accepting all risks of injury, damage or loss. If you are not willing to assume and accept these risks, please do not purchase a lift ticket at this resort. [See Wyoming Recreation Safety Act, Wyoming Statutes sections 1-1-121 through 1-1-123.]

JHMR is a smoke-free environment. Please, no smoking except for in designated outdoor smoking areas.

Have a Safety Suggestion?

 Safety Suggestions

No Reckless Individuals Allowed
This resort supports and enforces a policy adopted by the Legislature of the Great State of Wyoming. Individuals who enter closed areas, who are involved in hit and run collisions, who are impaired by alcohol or drugs or who act recklessly endangering themselves or others, may be subject to arrest, criminal prosecution, revocation or suspension of lift privileges and removal from the area. [See Wyoming Statutes sections 6-9-201, 6-9-301.]

All uphill pedestrian traffic, sledding and snowmobiling are forbidden within the area boundaries. Inverted aerials are not recommended.

Notice of Inherent Risks and Assumption of Risks
Alpine recreation involves a high mountain winter environment where activities create inherent risks, which may result in catastrophic injury or death. These risks include man-made and natural obstacles, both marked and unmarked including but not limited to: avalanche danger, non-avalanche related snow immersion, tree well immersion, changing weather, snow conditions, surface and subsurface conditions, variations in terrain, trees, gullies, cliffs, rocks, towers, snowmaking equipment, fencing, etc., failure to perform within one's ability and contact or collision with others or animals. CAUTION - snowcats, snowmobiles and snowmaking may be encountered at any time.

Lift Safety
Be advised that you cannot board a lift unless you have sufficient physical dexterity, ability and knowledge to negotiate or to use such lift safely, or until you have asked for and received information sufficient to enable you to load, ride and unload the lift safely. You may not use a lift or any ski trail when under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort stresses kids safety on chairlifts.  For FAQ's on chairlift safety for kids, check out KidsOnLifts.org. The video below is a great resource as well.

 

Slow Zones
Certain areas (highlighted on the map) are designated as SLOW ZONES. Please observe the posted slow zone areas by maintaining a speed no faster than the general flow of traffic. Fast and aggressive skiing and riding will not be tolerated.

Helmet Use
Jackson Hole Mountain Resort encourages you to educate yourself on the benefits and limitations of helmets. If you choose to wear one, please ski or ride as if your are not wearing one. Every winter sport participant shares responsibility for his or her safety and for that of others using the ski area facilities.

www.lidsonkids.org is a great resource for providing parents and other consumers with important helmet safety information complete with simple helmet sizing instructions to help ensure a proper fit. NSAA will continue to add content to the site as it becomes available. Make sure to add a link to LidsOnKids.org to your ski area website and other safety education collateral. Feel free to contact me for further information.

Treewell Safety
NARSID stands for Non-Avalanche Related Snow Immersion Death. NARSID incidents occur with deep snow or tree well immersions, in which a rider or skier falls into an area of deep, unconsolidated snow and becomes immobilized. The more the person struggles, the more entrapped in the snow they become, and risk suffocation.
     • Each skier or snowboarder controls his or her own level of risk and are the only ones that can prevent this type of accident from happening. Always ski and ride with a partner. To minimize your risk, you must know how to travel safely with your partners in these un-groomed deep snow areas
     • Always stay in visual contact so that your partner(s) can see you if you fall. Visual contact means stopping and watching your partner descend at all times, then proceeding downhill while he or she watches you at all times. It does no good if your partner is already waiting for you in lift line while you are still descending the slope;
    • Stay close enough to either pull or dig out. If you have any question about what "close enough" to assist someone in a tree well is, hold your breath while you are reading this. The amount of time before you need air may be how much time your partner has to pull or dig you out of danger. Other factors such as creating an air pocket or the position you fall in, may affect this critical timeframe.
    • Remember, if you lose visual contact with your partner you could lose your friend. It is important to know that most people who have died in deep snow or tree well accidents had been skiing or riding with "partners" at the time of their accident. Unfortunately, none of these partners were in visual contact so they were not able to be of help in a timely manner.
     • If you still have questions, contact JHMR patrol.

Backcountry Skiing
JHMR neither encourages nor discourages backcountry touring. Skiers/snowboarders crossing out of the JHMR boundaries do so at their own risk. Read the posted signs at the designated access gates before proceeding. Call the Bridger-Teton National Forest Backcountry Avalanche Hazard & Weather Forecast at 307.733.2664 for more information or contact our Guide Service at the Jackson Hole Mountain Sports School. 307.739.2779

Your Responsibility Code
Skiing can be enjoyed in many ways. At ski areas you may see people using alpine, snowboard, telemark, cross country and other specialized ski equipment, such as that used by disabled or other skiers. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers the responsibility for a great skiing experience.

  1. Stay in control.
  2. People ahead have the right of way.
  3. Stop in a safe place for you and others.
  4. When starting downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.
  5. Use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe signs and warnings, and keep off of closed trails.
  7. Know how to use the lifts safely.

Warning: Risk of Avalanche
While snow safety and avalanche mitigation efforts help reduce the risk of avalanches, avalanches and snow slides may occur at ski areas, both inside and outside of the posted boundaries. Avalanches are inherent risk of the sport due to the nature of snow and its application on steep mountain terrain. Become educated on how to reduce the risk of injury or death from avalanches through your own actions and awareness. Visit www.avalanche.org or contact JHMR ski patrol for further information on the risks and prevention of avalanche-related injuries or death.

Freestyle Terrain Areas
Freestyle Terrain Areas are designated with an orange oval and may contain jumps, hits, ramps, banks, fun boxes, jibs, rails, half pipes, quarter pipes, snowcross, bump terrain and other constructed or natural terrain features. Prior to using Freestyle Terrain, you are responsible for familiarizing yourself with Freestyle Terrain and obeying all instructions, warnings and signs. Freestyle skills require maintaining control on the ground, and in the air. Use of Freestyle Terrain exposes you to the risk of serious injury or death. Inverted aerials are not recommended. You assume the risk.

 

Freestyle Terrain has designations for size. Start small and work your way up. Designations are relative to this ski area.

  1. Make a plan: Everytime you use freestyle terrain, make a plan for each feature you want to use. Your speed, approach and take off will directly affect your maneuver and landing.
  2. Look before you leap: Every Scope around the jumps first, not over them. Know your landings are clear and clear yourself out of the landing area.
  3. Easy style it: Start small and work your way up. (Inverted aerials not recommended).
  4. Respect gets respect:From the lift line through the park.

Each feature can be broken down into 4 zones. Identify these zones and have a    plan before using any Freestyle Terrain.